The Filson Historical Society Digital Projects

Browse Items (36 total)

  • MssA_L668_F06_005e.jpg

    French identity card for 1935 and enclosed portraits of Sol Levy (1865-1944), a Jewish American who had emigrated from France. Sol Levy was born in 1865 in Alsace-Lorraine, a region that alternately fell under the control of Germany and France in the 19th century and during World Wars I and II in the 20th century. After migrating to the United States in 1882, Levy moved to Louisville and worked as a wholesale merchant, establishing the Gould-Levy Company in 1907.
  • MssA_L668_F06_004b.jpg

    World War II era French passport, identity card, war ration booklet, and bread rationing card in possession of Henrietta Levy Cerf (1866-1946), a French Jewish woman. Her brother Sol Levy arranged for her and other family members' immigration to the United States to escape German occupation and the Holocaust. Blank visa pages were not scanned.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_005.pdf

    French identity card of Denise Wolff (1909-2000), a Jewish Frenchwoman. Denise was the wife of Jacques Wolff (1903-1977), a nephew of Sol Levy. Levy arranged for the family's immigration to Louisville, Kentucky, to escape German occupation and the Holocaust.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_002.pdf

    French identity card of Arthur Wolff (1877-1941), a Jewish Frenchman. Arthur was the husband of Aline Levy Wolff (d. 1941), and her brother Sol Levy arranged for their family's immigration to the United States during World War II.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_001.pdf

    French driver's license for Denise Wolff (1909-2000), a Jewish Frenchwoman. Denise was the wife of Jacques Wolff (1903-1977), a nephew of Sol Levy. Levy arranged for the family's immigration to Louisville, Kentucky, during World War II.
  • MssBJ_C112_F1473.pdf

    Transcript of an oral history interview with Roosevelt Chin (1933-2007) conducted by interviewer Sloane Graff in the spring of 2002. Chin discusses his parents's immigration to the United States and their lives as Chinese restaurant owners in Louisville, Kentucky. He recounts his childhood association with Cabbage Patch Settlement House and his later paid work there, beginning in 1953.
  • MssBJ_C112_1531_access_reduction.mp3

    The second portion of an interview with Roosevelt Chin (1933-2007), a lifetime worker at the Cabbage Patch Settlement House in Louisville, Kentucky. Interview conducted by Keith Cardwell. The interview duration is one hour exactly. Contains racial slurs. Chin recounts a time when he was young and tried to walk to the Cabbage Patch, only to get lost in the city. Chin describes the Protestant founder of the Cabbage Patch, Louise Marshall (1888-1981), and recalls her lack of trust of Catholics. Chin recalls his experiences with Lloyd Redman (d. 2013), an athletics coach at the Cabbage Patch. Chin describes his early jobs at the Cabbage Patch and at Miss Marshall’s home, as well as his early impressions of Miss Marshall. Chin describes the conflicts between himself and other staff members, namely Charles Dietsch (1932-2020) and Jim Cooksey (d. 2015), after Miss Marshall became inactive in the early eighties. Chin discusses the establishment of a new board and the hiring of executive director Tracy Holladay at that time. Chin describes how the Cabbage Patch got its name in the early 1910s, as well as the settlement house’s connection to famous author Alan Hegan Rice (1870-1942). Chin describes the impact that the Cabbage Patch and Miss Marshall had upon himself and his entire family. Chin briefly describes the daycare and the well-baby clinic. Chin briefly details the Cabbage Patch as it existed in the 70s and the impact of the summer program director Rod Napier upon various activities at that time.

    For the first portion of the interview, see https://filsonhistorical.omeka.net/items/show/7008
  • MssBJ_C112_1530_access_reduction.mp3

    The first of a two-part interview with Roosevelt Chin (1933-2007), a lifetime worker at the Cabbage Patch Settlement House in Louisville, Kentucky. Interview conducted by Keith Cardwell. The interview duration is one hour and thirty-four seconds. Chin describes his college years and the transition from being a full-time student to accepting a full-time leadership position at the Cabbage Patch Settlement House. Chin describes the various theatrical productions and parties that he helped organize at the Cabbage Patch. Chin describes the innerworkings of the Sewing School. Chin opines on how the changes in school bussing schedules brought about a low period for the Cabbage Patch. Chin describes the process by which Black people were integrated into the Cabbage Patch in the late 1950s. Chin describes the years of declining health in the life of the founder of the Cabbage Patch, Louise Marshall (1888-1981). Chin details the responsibilities to Miss Marshall which were put upon him and other Cabbage Patch staff members who were close to Miss Marshall during her final years. Chin describes the conflicts between board members and staff members of the Cabbage Patch after Miss Marshall became inactive in the early 1980s.
  • 024x6_becke_201106.jpg

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Enid German-Beck (1930-) in November 2010. The summary is accompanied by photographs of Enid, her homes, and her family and friends, dating from the 1930s-1950s, 2011. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2023/12/parsons-shorty-funeral.jpg

    A scrapbook page on Shorty, the Irish terrier mascot of No. 1 Hook and Ladder Company and No. 2 Engine Company in Louisville, Kentucky. A photograph on the top left corner of the page captures Shorty standing on a brick road. A large photograph on the right hand side of the page shows Shorty seated in the passenger seat of a firetruck with firefighters and a woman posing around him. A veteran of 1,000 fires, Shorty died from falling from his accustomed place on the driver’s seat of the fire engine pumper. The remaining two photographs are on the bottom left of the page and labeled "Shorty Nov 26 1931." They depict Shorty's burial in the lawn plot between the No. 1 Hook and Ladder Company and the water tower at Sixth Street and Jefferson Street.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2023/12/989pc9x_21.jpg

    Silver gelatin print of Mona Williams posing with her dog Micky by British society photographer Cecil Beaton. A society column in the Daily News in February 1938 claims: “Mona (Mrs. Harrison) Williams intends to perpetuate the breed of Micky, the pooch she brought back from her last visit to Capri. It takes only one short glance at Micky to appreciate that he is a classic example of a genuine mutt. Mona picked up the small, beige mishap from a peasant in the public square on the Isle of Capri. The peasant wouldn’t sell the loveable mongrel but was willing to trade with Mrs. Williams for a thoroughbred Pekinese. This Winter, Mona heard that Micky’s mother had been found, and she sent for her to start breeding a race of ‘Tiberian Terriers’.” Countess Mona von Bismarck, one of the leading lights of international café society, was born in Louisville, Kentucky, in 1897 and raised in Lexington. She married five times throughout her life and each marriage propelled her upwards in society. Her status reached its pinnacle with her third marriage to Harrison Williams, who was known as the richest man in America.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2023/12/994pc24_61.jpg

    Photograph of Samuel McKee Burbank (1886 or 1887-1933) posing with his dog.
  • MssAR_H225_3107_1.jpg

    Residential drawings for Good Housekeeping Magazine by Louisville, Kentucky architect Stratton O. Hammon.
  • MssAR_H225_F008_3504.jpg

    Front elevation drawing for Paul M. Kendall Co. residence on Transylvania Avenue.
  • MssAR_H225_3309_1.jpg

    Front elevation and plot plan for Mr. and Mrs. Dillman Rash's residence on Cherokee Gardens lots 66 and 67 in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • MssBA_P738_F09_001_OCR.pdf

    The "Report of Activities of Plymouth Settlement House: 'A Community Chest Agency' 1938-1939" is a nine-page pamphlet documenting the management, staff, policies, and how the house provides aid to the surrounding community in the Russell neighborhood of Louisville, Kentucky, through pictures and descriptions. The pamphlet also documents the enrollment and organizations of the settlement house, with a detailed weekly schedule included. The Plymouth Settlement House conducted a survey of the surrounding community and found the economic background, interest, and recreation of the people interviewed.
  • Gabby_001.jpg

    Selection of two illustrations for the book Gabby Gaffer by Louisville, Kentucky artist Carrie Douglas Dudley Ewen.
  • 1926-christmas-seal_4797541946_o.jpg

    5 annual Christmas seals sold by the Louisville Tuberculosis Association as a fundraiser.
  • MssSB_L888_V3_SealsArticle.jpg

    Newspaper clipping on the Louisville Tuberculosis Association's 1931 Christmas Seals Campaign poster. Text on the poster reads "Buy Christmas Seals / Fight Tuberculosis / 25th annual seal sale / 1931." The poster design features a snowy scence of a stage coach passing by two Tudor-style buildings.
  • 015PC55.03.jpg

    Photograph of real estate developer James Taylor in front of his Tudor Revival home at 6600 Shirley Avenue in the James T. Taylor Subdivision of Louisville, Kentucky.
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