The Filson Historical Society Digital Projects

Browse Items (1451 total)

  • MssA_L668_F06_005e.jpg

    French identity card for 1935 and enclosed portraits of Sol Levy (1865-1944), a Jewish American who had emigrated from France. Sol Levy was born in 1865 in Alsace-Lorraine, a region that alternately fell under the control of Germany and France in the 19th century and during World Wars I and II in the 20th century. After migrating to the United States in 1882, Levy moved to Louisville and worked as a wholesale merchant, establishing the Gould-Levy Company in 1907.
  • MssA_L668_F06_004b.jpg

    World War II era French passport, identity card, war ration booklet, and bread rationing card in possession of Henrietta Levy Cerf (1866-1946), a French Jewish woman. Her brother Sol Levy arranged for her and other family members' immigration to the United States to escape German occupation and the Holocaust. Blank visa pages were not scanned.
  • MssA_L668_F06_003d.jpg

    French passport for Eugénie Baer Hirsch (1880-1967), a French Jewish woman. She was married to Jacques Hirsch and the mother of Denise Hirsch Wolff (1909-2000). She immigrated to the United States and moved to Louisville, Kentucky, where her daughter had moved during World War II. Blank visa pages were not scanned.
  • MssA_L668_F06_002g.jpg

    World War II era French passport and additional documents such as a Remitter's receipt and a ticket owned by Denise Hirsch Wolff (1909-2000), a French Jewish woman. She was married to Jacques Wolff (1903-1977). The passport includes photographs of their young children, Francis Wolff (1931- ) and Hubert Wolff (1938- ). Blank visa pages were not scanned.

    Denise's uncle Sol Levy arranged for her family's immigration to Louisville, Kentucky, to escape German occupation and the Holocaust. The passport shows that in 1941, the family traveled in Spain and Portugal before boarding a ship to New York City.
  • MssA_L668_F06_001c.jpg

    World War II era French passport for Jacques Wolff (1903-1977), a Jewish man. He was married to Denise Wolff (1909-2000). His uncle Sol Levy arranged for their family's immigration to Louisville, Kentucky, to escape German occupation and the Holocaust. The passport shows that in 1941, the family traveled to Spain and Portugal before taking a ship to New York City. Blank visa pages were not scanned.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_011.pdf

    French identity card of Eugénie Baer Hirsch, a Jewish woman. She was married to Jacques Hirsch and the mother of Denise Hirsch Wolff (1909-2000).
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_005.pdf

    French identity card of Denise Wolff (1909-2000), a Jewish Frenchwoman. Denise was the wife of Jacques Wolff (1903-1977), a nephew of Sol Levy. Levy arranged for the family's immigration to Louisville, Kentucky, to escape German occupation and the Holocaust.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_004.pdf

    French identity card of Eugénie Baer Hirsch (1880-1967), a Jewish Frenchwoman. Eugénie was the widow of Jacques Hirsch, and mother of Denise Hirsch Wolff (1909-2000). She immigrated to the United States in 1947 and settled in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_002.pdf

    French identity card of Arthur Wolff (1877-1941), a Jewish Frenchman. Arthur was the husband of Aline Levy Wolff (d. 1941), and her brother Sol Levy arranged for their family's immigration to the United States during World War II.
  • 019PC48_F46_001.jpg

    A photograph of children and faculty from the Louisville, Kentucky Cabbage Patch Settlement House outside of an unspecified government building in Washington D.C with Kentucky senator Thruston Ballard Morton. Two copies of this picture are in file; one copy dates the photograph to the August of 1966 while the other copy dates the photograph to the September of the same year. Notes in the Cabbage Patch file indicate that the Cabbage Patch children took camping trips to Washington D.C on at least five occasions; senator Morton hosted the Cabbage Patch children twice. This is the second trip that was hosted by Morton, the first having taken place in 1962. Senator Morton is in the far right of the photograph. Also included in the photograph is Roosevelt Chin, a lifetime Cabbage Patch faculty member, who can be found in the top center of the photograph. Also included in the photograph is Joe Burks, a Cabbage Patch coach and organizer, who can found at the far left of the photograph with glasses on.
  • 019PC48_F43_001.jpg

    Photograph of children and faculty at the Louisville, Kentucky Cabbage Patch Settlement House and arranged around a table; they appear to be replicating the last supper. They are in costume. The picture is not dated. In interviews, lifelong Cabbage Patch faculty member Roosevelt Chin claimed that the Cabbage Patch would put on multiple extravagant Bible story plays on holidays. These plays would be written by Roosevelt Chin and Mrs. John R. Green, who ran the Cabbage Patch Sewing School. Sceneries would by constructed by Roosevelt Chin and the Sewing School children; the costumes would be made from scraps collected from rummage sales by the Sewing School children.
  • 019PC48_F44_001.jpg

    A photograph of children and faculty from the Louisville, Kentucky Cabbage Patch Settlement House drinking soda and sitting on the floor in the office of Louisville Senator Thruston Ballard Morton in Washington D.C. An inscription on the bottom of the photograph dates the photograph to the August of 1962. Notes in the Cabbage Patch file indicate that the Cabbage Patch children took camping trips to Washington D.C on at least five occasions; senator Morton hosted the Cabbage Patch children twice. This 1962 trip to D.C was allegedly the only Cabbage Patch camping trip attended by Cabbage Patch founder Louise Marshall. Miss Marshall can be found in the far left of this photograph. Also in this photograph, also on the left side, is Roosevelt Chin, a lifelong worker for the Cabbage Patch. Senator Morton is at the top of the photograph, near the center, in a dark suit and tie.
  • 019PC48_F54_001.jpg

    A Polaroid photograph of a little girl with a Santa Claus at the annual Cabbage Patch Christmas party. The back of the photograph dates the photograph to 1979. According to the lifetime Cabbage Patch worker Roosevelt Chin, Cabbage Patch Christmas parties were often "sponsored by one of the companies in the neighborhood." A letter from early 1980 suggests that this particular Christmas party was hosted by the Martin Sweets Company.
  • 019PC48_F05_001.jpg

    A photograph of the Cabbage Patch Settlement House football team, dated 1956. The team includes both Black and white children. The Cabbage Patch Settlement House desegregated their football team in the 50s. In interviews, the lifetime Cabbage Patch worker Roosevelt Chin claimed that the Cabbage Patch was "the very first" youth group in Louisville to desegregate. One member of this desegregated football team, Sherman Lewis, would go on to become a Super Bowl winning offensive coach.
  • MssBJ_C112_F230c_1957_004.jpg

    A United States passport issued to Roosevelt Chin, a Chinese American student from Louisville, Kentucky who worked with the Cabbage Patch Settlement House for over fifty years. The passport is from 1957, when Chin traveled to Hong Kong; stamps from Hong Kong are found in the passport. Chin would later say that he always wanted to visit China, but that Hong Kong was the closest that he ever came. Hong Kong was under British authority at the time and the United States Department of State forbade passage to Communist China; a notice on the inside of the passport warns that the passport is not valid for travel to any nations "under Communist control."
  • 024x6_becke_201106.jpg

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Enid German-Beck (1930-) in November 2010. The summary is accompanied by photographs of Enid, her homes, and her family and friends, dating from the 1930s-1950s, 2011. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_drutzr_201306.jpg

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Riva Drutz (1921-) on February 22, 2011. The summary is accompanied by a photograph of Drutz taken by Margaret Mazanec at a party on June 26, 2013. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_fleischerb_201512.jpg

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Babette Fleischer (1944-) on December 22, 2015. The summary is accompanied by a photograph of Fleischer seated in a chair in December 2015. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_goldsteind_201306.jpg

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Daisy Goldstein (1933-) on December 10, 2010. The summary is accompanied by a photograph of Goldstein taken by Margaret Mazanec at a party on June 23, 2013. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_goldsteini_80s90s.jpg

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Irvin Goldstein (1929-) in 2010 and 2018. The summary is accompanied by a circa 1980s-1990s portrait of Goldstein, photograph of Goldstein taken by Margaret Mazanec on June 23, 2013, biography, and resume. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.

    Irvin Goldstein descends from Polish and Russian ancestry and was born in Louisville, speaking English and a little Yiddish in his family. Irv lived in the Highlands with other family members in the area and maintained Jewish practice by attending synagogue at Adath Jeshurun. During the Great Flood of 1937 his family was a little crowded in their house as they also welcomed his aunt and three cousins after their basement suffered flooding, and they received typhoid shots at a local library. Beyond that, nothing especially severe occurred to his household. Irvin observed all Holy Days with his family, was confirmed in Cincinnati, Ohio, and was also Bar Mitzvah’d. Following high school at Ohio Military Institute then Male High School, he attended the University of Kentucky, where he ultimately majored in Elementary Education. He wound up teaching Canada, followed by New Albany, Indiana. He enjoys building model airplanes and H. O. model railroads, has a stamp collection, and values the participation of his children and grandchildren in Jewish activities.
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