The Filson Historical Society Digital Projects

Browse Items (259 total)

  • 024x6_blosteinh_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Henrietta Blostein (1922-) on July 13, 2011. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_bornsteind_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Donald Bornstein (1923-2009) on October 22, 2001. The summary is accompanied by an obituary for Donald Bornstein. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_bornsteine_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Eddie Bornstein (1941-) on February 10, 2010. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_bornsteinel_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Elaine Benovitz Bornstein in 2001. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_bornsteinm_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Marsha Bornstein (1945-) in Winter 2008. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.

    Marsha Bornstein was raised in a Jewish household in Louisville with three sisters, primarily speaking Yiddish while at home. She lived in a densely populated Jewish area and attended Hawthorne Elementary School in her youth. As a young Jewish woman she attended and was confirmed at Keneseth Israel with no Bat Mitzvah. Marsha earned her BA in Sociology from Ohio State University and upon returning to Louisville joined the Jewish Community Center. Her parents ran a liquor store, the duties of which were taken over by her mother when her father fought in the Pacific Theater in World War II. She enjoyed bowling with friends and staying up late, waiting for her father to return home from the liquor store.
  • 024x6_brillr_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Roselyn Brill (1929-) on October 10, 2001. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_brodersonm_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Miriam Broderson (1930-) on September 24, 2018. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_brodyl_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Larry Brody (1932-) on August 15, 2011. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_bronnerb_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Betty Bronner (1929-2015) on November 6, 2008. The summary is accompanied by an obituary for Betty Bronner. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_burker_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Ruth Burke (1922-) on July 12, 2007. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.

    Ruth S. Burke grew up in Nashville, Tennessee, to Austrian immigrant parents, in a household that spoke English, Yiddish, and German on occasion. She lived in a middle class town with all necessary amenities and traveled north occasionally to see extended family members. Growing up Jewish, she observed all major feasts with her family, her father being most influential as he assisted in founding a synagogue, while she had a Christian elementary education and was eventually confirmed. Her latter education consisted of attending Vanderbilt and Peabody universities, earning her degrees in both English and Education. Upon moving to Louisville for her husband’s employment as a government engineer she joined the Jewish Community Center. She grew up with a special personal connection with Mezuzahs. Her father returned to Europe in 1934 in an attempt to convince other family members to leave, but nobody returned. Ruth’s family was generally unaffected by Middle Eastern conflicts in later years. She enjoys reading, art, music, and passing on her Jewish customs and values to her children and grandchildren.
  • 024x6_cohene_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Edwin Cohen (1921-) in August 2011. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_coheng_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Gordon Cohen (1928-) on July 15, 2011. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_cumblerj_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Judith Cumbler on August 6, 2007. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_davide_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Esther David (1931-) on July 27, 2007. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_davisa_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Arthur Davis on June 21, 2012. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_davisf_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Faye Davis (1917-) on July 17, 2001. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_diamondc_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Rabbi Chester Diamond (1936-) on February 22, 2011. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.

    Rabbi Chester B. Diamond grew up in a Brooklyn apartment to Russian-American parents. Despite growing up Jewish and in a Jewish neighborhood, he had very little ties to Jewish practice, but he still received a Bar Mitzvah. He came to Louisville when he was 27 as an assistant to Dr. Herbert S. Waller, a Rabbi at Temple Adath Israel. He eventually joined Dr. Waller at the Temple full-time. Not until 1957, while stationed at Lowry Air Force Base in Denver, Colorado, did he begin his journey toward becoming a Rabbi. Upon hearing distressing news that a synagogue in Atlanta, Georgia, had been bombed, he probed further into the faith. He found a personal calling to enter Rabbinic school, taking two years to earn a BA in Hebrew Literature, and later in the year he met Dr. Waller, whom he assisted on weekends while enrolled in seminary in Cincinnati. Growing up Jewish in New York, he participated in blackout raids and wartime protective measures like rationing, but received very little anti-semitism amongst fellow Brooklyners. Memories of Jewish influence in his youth were largely positive, collectively helping him find his calling as a Rabbi through means of prayer books, study at seminary, and the Atlanta Bombing, which would be the catalyst through which he transformed as a spiritual person. Continuing his Rabbihood, he intends to walk with God and allow others to determine the legacy he will be remembered for.
  • 024x6_dicterh_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Harriet Dicter (1921-) in September 2011. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_drutzr_201306.jpg

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Riva Drutz (1921-) on February 22, 2011. The summary is accompanied by a photograph of Drutz taken by Margaret Mazanec at a party on June 26, 2013. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_erlena_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Al Erlen (1906-2003) on May 6, 2002. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.

    Al Erlen came to Louisville after being born and raised in Columbus, Ohio, to a family that spoke Yiddish at home. Encouraged by his parents to become a Rabbi, he studied Talmud Chumash near a synagogue within walking distance from his house. All Jewish holidays were observed in his kosher household, especially Shabbat, and these practices led him to have a Bar Mitzvah but not confirmation. After receiving a BS in Education from Ohio State University and a MA in Humanities in hopes of becoming a German language professor, he instead moved down to Louisville as Executive Director of Jewish Welfare Federation, for which he was prioritized over wartime service. He met his wife, Selma, at a school in Cleveland while they both worked there, and upon moving to Louisville they joined the Jewish Community Center.. His interests include golfing, reading, listening to music, dancing, and spending time with children and grandchildren, for whom he hopes to leave behind a legacy of caring for others and abiding by the golden rule, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”
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