The Filson Historical Society Digital Projects

Browse Items (279 total)

  • MssBJ_C112_F1473.pdf

    Transcript of an oral history interview with Roosevelt Chin (1933-2007) conducted by interviewer Sloane Graff in the spring of 2002. Chin discusses his parents's immigration to the United States and their lives as Chinese restaurant owners in Louisville, Kentucky. He recounts his childhood association with Cabbage Patch Settlement House and his later paid work there, beginning in 1953.
  • CabbagePatch_Chin_Male.jpg

    A pennant from Male High School, a public school in Louisville, Kentucky. This pennant was owned by Roosevelt Chin, a Chinese American from Louisville, Kentucky who worked with the Cabbage Patch Settlement House for over fifty years. The pennant is made of felt. It is purple with gold lettering and a gold strip across the leftmost side. Roosevelt Chin graduated from Male High School in 1951. Chin would later say that while he attended art school in New York, he would always return home for the annual Male-Manual rivalry football game.
  • MssBJ_C112_F230c_1957_004.jpg

    A United States passport issued to Roosevelt Chin, a Chinese American student from Louisville, Kentucky who worked with the Cabbage Patch Settlement House for over fifty years. The passport is from 1957, when Chin traveled to Hong Kong; stamps from Hong Kong are found in the passport. Chin would later say that he always wanted to visit China, but that Hong Kong was the closest that he ever came. Hong Kong was under British authority at the time and the United States Department of State forbade passage to Communist China; a notice on the inside of the passport warns that the passport is not valid for travel to any nations "under Communist control."
  • MssBJ_C112_1531_access_reduction.mp3

    The second portion of an interview with Roosevelt Chin (1933-2007), a lifetime worker at the Cabbage Patch Settlement House in Louisville, Kentucky. Interview conducted by Keith Cardwell. The interview duration is one hour exactly. Contains racial slurs. Chin recounts a time when he was young and tried to walk to the Cabbage Patch, only to get lost in the city. Chin describes the Protestant founder of the Cabbage Patch, Louise Marshall (1888-1981), and recalls her lack of trust of Catholics. Chin recalls his experiences with Lloyd Redman (d. 2013), an athletics coach at the Cabbage Patch. Chin describes his early jobs at the Cabbage Patch and at Miss Marshall’s home, as well as his early impressions of Miss Marshall. Chin describes the conflicts between himself and other staff members, namely Charles Dietsch (1932-2020) and Jim Cooksey (d. 2015), after Miss Marshall became inactive in the early eighties. Chin discusses the establishment of a new board and the hiring of executive director Tracy Holladay at that time. Chin describes how the Cabbage Patch got its name in the early 1910s, as well as the settlement house’s connection to famous author Alan Hegan Rice (1870-1942). Chin describes the impact that the Cabbage Patch and Miss Marshall had upon himself and his entire family. Chin briefly describes the daycare and the well-baby clinic. Chin briefly details the Cabbage Patch as it existed in the 70s and the impact of the summer program director Rod Napier upon various activities at that time.

    For the first portion of the interview, see https://filsonhistorical.omeka.net/items/show/7008
  • 024x6_abersong_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Genie Aberson (1940-) on July 30, 2007. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_abersonl_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Leslie D. Aberson (1936-) on February 4, 2002. The summary is accompanied by Aberson's resume. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_abramsm_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Marie Abrams (1937-) on October 2, 2001. The summary is accompanied by Marie Abrams's resume. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_abramsn_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Nancy Abrams (1938-) on February 6, 2002. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.

    Nancy K. Abrams was born in Louisville, and grew up in the Highlands in her youth. Her daily life included attending middle and high school, Sunday school on weekends, and socializing with friends at a Bardstown Road drug store. She and her family were largely unaffected by the local flood of 1937 and the international Jewish crisis of the Holocaust and Israeli conflicts. She maintained Jewish faith by being confirmed and participating in the NCJW, a demonstration of social service she passed on to subsequent generations in her family.
  • 024x6_abramsr_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Ronald Abrams (1936-) on October 2, 2001. The summary is accompanied by Ronald Abrams's resume. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_baerb_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Blema Baer (1914-2013) on August 7, 2007. The summary is accompanied by an obituary for Blema Baer. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_baere_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Ethel Baer (1924-2012) on October 26, 2010. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.

    Ethel C. Baer was born to Polish immigrant parents and was raised in a practicing Jewish household in which she spoke Yiddish and English. Her neighborhood, in which very few other Jewish families lived, accepted her and she made many good friends. She attended Atherton High School and enjoyed going to drugstores with friends, walking Cave Hill Cemetery, and getting groceries locally from farmers and butchers. The Baers were not severely affected by the Great Flood; however, they did assist others in escaping the floodwaters and finding food. Each side of the family lost relatives in the Holocaust. Ethel’s husband served in WWII when he was 19-21 years old. Ethel was heavily involved in religious life and practice, observing feasts such as Passover at home, keeping strictly kosher, and her daughter had a Bat Mitzvah at age 50. Her interests include playing Bridge, playing piano for senior citizens at the Jewish Community Center, and living life by the mantra of “Live and Let Live.”
  • 024x6_bailens_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Shirley Bailen (1922-2019) in May 2018. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_balleisenc_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Caroline Balleisen (1930-2020) in September 2011. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_banksh_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Helene Banks in 2001. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_banksn_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Norman Banks (1918-2008) on July 26, 2001. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_barrm_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Margot Barr (1929-2015) on June 29, 2010. The summary is accompanied by an obituary for Margot Barr. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_becke_201106.jpg

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Enid German-Beck (1930-) in November 2010. The summary is accompanied by photographs of Enid, her homes, and her family and friends, dating from the 1930s-1950s, 2011. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_behrc_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Carol Behr (1933-) on December 23, 2011. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_benjaminj_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Jack Benjamin (1927-) on July 24, 2001. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_bernsteinm_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Madeline Bernstein (1926-) in 2001. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.

    Madeline Bernstein grew up in a Jewish household in which her family spoke Russian, Yiddish, and English. She attended Synagogue with her family despite not having a full time Rabbi; however, she was not confirmed and did not receive a Bat Mitzvah. She lived in a primarily German and Polish part of Louisville. After attending Indiana University with her husband she came to Louisville, had three children together, and joined the Jewish Community Center as a family. Though losing her brother, uncle, and her uncle’s children to the Second World War, she maintained good health herself. Her pastimes include playing Bridge, Maj Jong, volunteering in Louisville, and following in the footsteps of her mother to pass on her values to future generations.
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