The Filson Historical Society Digital Projects

Browse Items (236 total)

  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f08_002.pdf

    Newspaper of the Louisville, Kentucky, Jewish Community Center and National Council of Jewish Women's Club 60. The publication includes an article beginning on page 3 that details the youth, immigration, and subsequent settling of Jewish Frenchman Jacques Wolff (1903-1977) in the United States. Includes his service in the French army, and his personal losses to the German army and the Holocaust, after which he was able to work in wholesale business in Louisville, Kentucky. Jacques was the husband of Denise Wolff, one of the founders of Club 60.

    Pages 6-8 are missing from the original version in the Filson's collection.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/09/020pc15_f6_013.jpg

    The Abramson Family gathered for a Sabbath celebration the Friday night before Jerry Abramson's swearing in for his first term as mayor of Louisville.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_002.pdf

    French identity card of Arthur Wolff (1877-1941), a Jewish Frenchman. Arthur was the husband of Aline Levy Wolff (d. 1941), and her brother Sol Levy arranged for their family's immigration to the United States during World War II.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_003.pdf

    Certification of ability to operate an automobile for Arthur Wolff (1877-1941), a Jewish Frenchman. Arthur was married to Aline Levy Wolff (d. 1941), and her brother Sol Levy arranged for their family's immigration to the United States during World War II.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f08_003.pdf

    Autobiography written in English by Denise Wolff (1909-2000), a Jewish French American that immigrated to the United States during World War II. She describes her youth in France, hardship during German occupation during World War II, and immigration to the United States via Spain and Portugal, and activities she took part in at the Temple in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • MssA_L668_F06_002g.jpg

    World War II era French passport and additional documents such as a Remitter's receipt and a ticket owned by Denise Hirsch Wolff (1909-2000), a French Jewish woman. She was married to Jacques Wolff (1903-1977). The passport includes photographs of their young children, Francis Wolff (1931- ) and Hubert Wolff (1938- ). Blank visa pages were not scanned.

    Denise's uncle Sol Levy arranged for her family's immigration to Louisville, Kentucky, to escape German occupation and the Holocaust. The passport shows that in 1941, the family traveled in Spain and Portugal before boarding a ship to New York City.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_005.pdf

    French identity card of Denise Wolff (1909-2000), a Jewish Frenchwoman. Denise was the wife of Jacques Wolff (1903-1977), a nephew of Sol Levy. Levy arranged for the family's immigration to Louisville, Kentucky, to escape German occupation and the Holocaust.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_001.pdf

    French driver's license for Denise Wolff (1909-2000), a Jewish Frenchwoman. Denise was the wife of Jacques Wolff (1903-1977), a nephew of Sol Levy. Levy arranged for the family's immigration to Louisville, Kentucky, during World War II.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_004.pdf

    French identity card of Eugénie Baer Hirsch (1880-1967), a Jewish Frenchwoman. Eugénie was the widow of Jacques Hirsch, and mother of Denise Hirsch Wolff (1909-2000). She immigrated to the United States in 1947 and settled in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_011.pdf

    French identity card of Eugénie Baer Hirsch, a Jewish woman. She was married to Jacques Hirsch and the mother of Denise Hirsch Wolff (1909-2000).
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_010.pdf

    Declaration of change of residence for Eugénie Baer Hirsch, a French Jewish woman. She was married to Jacques Hirsch and the mother of Denise Hirsch Wolff (1909-2000). She immigrated to the United States and moved to Louisville, Kentucky, where her daughter had moved during World War II.
  • MssA_L668_F06_003d.jpg

    French passport for Eugénie Baer Hirsch (1880-1967), a French Jewish woman. She was married to Jacques Hirsch and the mother of Denise Hirsch Wolff (1909-2000). She immigrated to the United States and moved to Louisville, Kentucky, where her daughter had moved during World War II. Blank visa pages were not scanned.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_009.pdf

    World War II era French safe conduct pass for Eugénie Baer Hirsch, a French Jewish woman. She was married to Jacques Hirsch and the mother of Denise Hirsch Wolff (1909-2000).
  • MssA_L668_F06_004b.jpg

    World War II era French passport, identity card, war ration booklet, and bread rationing card in possession of Henrietta Levy Cerf (1866-1946), a French Jewish woman. Her brother Sol Levy arranged for her and other family members' immigration to the United States to escape German occupation and the Holocaust. Blank visa pages were not scanned.
  • 024x6_erlena_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Al Erlen (1906-2003) on May 6, 2002. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.

    Al Erlen came to Louisville after being born and raised in Columbus, Ohio, to a family that spoke Yiddish at home. Encouraged by his parents to become a Rabbi, he studied Talmud Chumash near a synagogue within walking distance from his house. All Jewish holidays were observed in his kosher household, especially Shabbat, and these practices led him to have a Bar Mitzvah but not confirmation. After receiving a BS in Education from Ohio State University and a MA in Humanities in hopes of becoming a German language professor, he instead moved down to Louisville as Executive Director of Jewish Welfare Federation, for which he was prioritized over wartime service. He met his wife, Selma, at a school in Cleveland while they both worked there, and upon moving to Louisville they joined the Jewish Community Center.. His interests include golfing, reading, listening to music, dancing, and spending time with children and grandchildren, for whom he hopes to leave behind a legacy of caring for others and abiding by the golden rule, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”
  • 024x6_winera_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Aliene Winer (1929-2015) on July 31, 2001. The summary is accompanied by an obituary for Aliene Winer. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.

    Ailene Winer moved to Louisville after being enrolled at Indiana University. She grew up in Chicago, Illinois, and later moved to Los Angeles after her parents divorced. While there she found Jewish friends and observed all holy days, including being confirmed. Ailene assisted at Adath Jeshurun in her youth. Her spiritual experiences include Frank Lloyd Wright’s architecture and reaching out to the Lord in difficult times. She enjoys spending time with grandchildren, art, and engaging in activities future generations will remember her fondly as “fun” for.
  • 024x6_steinberga_2010s_1.jpg

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Allan Steinberg (1941-) on April 14, 2015. The summary is accompanied by two circa 2010s photographs of Steinberg, his resume, and clippings on him. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_webera_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Anita Weber (1931-) on August 3, 2007. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 024x6_kleina_2002_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Ann Klein (1921-2012) on January 21, 2002. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.

    Ann Klein was born and raised in Eger, Hungary, to a family that celebrated all holy days and attended Synagogue. A Holocaust survivor, she was assigned a job in an Auschwitz kitchen, and following a death march westward, was eventually freed in Wurzen, Germany. She came to America having accepted a marriage proposal from the man who would be her husband, and moved to Louisville when he took a post-doctorial fellowship at the University of Louisville. While in Louisville, she remained active in her faith, becoming a member of the National Council of Jewish Women, and fundraising for the Louisville Fund for the Arts, for which she shared experiences of the Holocaust. She enjoys music, playing piano, swimming, and hopes to leave behind a memory of promoting peace and being a moral human being.
  • 024x6_kleina_2009_ocr.pdf

    Summary of an oral history interview conducted with Ann Klein (1921-2012) on January 15, 2009. The interview was part of the Louisville Jewish Family and Career Services's project to document the lives of Jewish seniors in Louisville, Kentucky.

    Ann Klein was born and raised in Eger, Hungary, to a family that celebrated all holy days and attended Synagogue. A Holocaust survivor, she was assigned a job in an Auschwitz kitchen, and following a death march westward, was eventually freed in Wurzen, Germany. She came to America having accepted a marriage proposal from the man who would be her husband, and moved to Louisville when he took a post-doctorial fellowship at the University of Louisville. While in Louisville, she remained active in her faith, becoming a member of the National Council of Jewish Women, and fundraising for the Louisville Fund for the Arts, for which she shared experiences of the Holocaust. She enjoys music, playing piano, swimming, and hopes to leave behind a memory of promoting peace and being a moral human being.
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