The Filson Historical Society Digital Projects

Browse Items (44 total)

  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f08_001.pdf

    Seven-page speech by Denise Wolff (1909-2000) detailing life and agony in Nazi occupied France during World War II, her family's immigration to the United States and Louisville, Kentucky, in 1941, and news of the Holocaust.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f07_007.pdf

    One-page letter written in French to Jacques Wolff (1903-1977).
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f07_006.pdf

    Postcard written in French to Jacques Wolff (1903-1977) that mentions a United States courier.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f07_005.pdf

    Letter in French written to married couple Albert Wolff (1906-1989) and Jean Wolff (1913-1986) from Albert's brother Jacques Wolff (1903-1977), about arranging immigration visas.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f07_004.pdf

    Letter, written in French, to Albert Wolff (1906-1989) mentioning embarkment to New York.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f07_003.pdf

    Letter, written in French, to Monsieur Gillet sent by Georges Wolff (1917- ) with questions for Gillet to address.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f07_002.pdf

    Letter, written in French, to Monsieur Lux sent by Georges Wolff (1917- ) mentioning Jean-Paul Wolff (1915- ) and German occupation.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f07_001.pdf

    Letter from Malou Lavaux to Albert Wolff (1906-1989) explaining wartime struggles, family connections, and the German's arrest and imprisonment of Albert's brother Jean-Paul Wolff.
  • MssA_L668_F06_004b.jpg

    World War II era French passport, identity card, war ration booklet, and bread rationing card in possession of Henrietta Levy Cerf (1866-1946), a French Jewish woman. Her brother Sol Levy arranged for her and other family members' immigration to the United States to escape German occupation and the Holocaust. Blank visa pages were not scanned.
  • MssA_L668_F06_003d.jpg

    French passport for Eugénie Baer Hirsch (1880-1967), a French Jewish woman. She was married to Jacques Hirsch and the mother of Denise Hirsch Wolff (1909-2000). She immigrated to the United States and moved to Louisville, Kentucky, where her daughter had moved during World War II. Blank visa pages were not scanned.
  • MssA_L668_F06_002g.jpg

    World War II era French passport and additional documents such as a Remitter's receipt and a ticket owned by Denise Hirsch Wolff (1909-2000), a French Jewish woman. She was married to Jacques Wolff (1903-1977). The passport includes photographs of their young children, Francis Wolff (1931- ) and Hubert Wolff (1938- ). Blank visa pages were not scanned.

    Denise's uncle Sol Levy arranged for her family's immigration to Louisville, Kentucky, to escape German occupation and the Holocaust. The passport shows that in 1941, the family traveled in Spain and Portugal before boarding a ship to New York City.
  • MssA_L668_F06_001c.jpg

    World War II era French passport for Jacques Wolff (1903-1977), a Jewish man. He was married to Denise Wolff (1909-2000). His uncle Sol Levy arranged for their family's immigration to Louisville, Kentucky, to escape German occupation and the Holocaust. The passport shows that in 1941, the family traveled to Spain and Portugal before taking a ship to New York City. Blank visa pages were not scanned.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_010.pdf

    Declaration of change of residence for Eugénie Baer Hirsch, a French Jewish woman. She was married to Jacques Hirsch and the mother of Denise Hirsch Wolff (1909-2000). She immigrated to the United States and moved to Louisville, Kentucky, where her daughter had moved during World War II.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_009.pdf

    World War II era French safe conduct pass for Eugénie Baer Hirsch, a French Jewish woman. She was married to Jacques Hirsch and the mother of Denise Hirsch Wolff (1909-2000).
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_008.pdf

    World War II era French safe conduct pass for Jacques Hirsch, a Jewish Frenchman. He was married to Eugénie Baer Hirsch (1880-1967).
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_007.pdf

    Formal release of Jacques Wolff (1903-1977) from French military service during World War II. For more on Jacques service and life, see this 1965 biography: https://filsonhistorical.omeka.net/items/show/7047
    Jacques was married to Denise Wolff (1909-2000). His uncle Sol Levy arranged for their family's immigration to Louisville, Kentucky, to escape German occupation and the Holocaust.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_006.pdf

    Two-page letter from Francis Wolff (1931- ) to his father Jacques Wolff (1903-1977). Written in French.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f05_004.pdf

    French identity card of Eugénie Baer Hirsch (1880-1967), a Jewish Frenchwoman. Eugénie was the widow of Jacques Hirsch, and mother of Denise Hirsch Wolff (1909-2000). She immigrated to the United States in 1947 and settled in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.wordpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/07/mssa_l668_f02_002.pdf

    A two-page letter from Jewish American B. J. Lee to A. H. Frenke, confirming to Frenke that the Wolff family will receive passage from Lisbon, Portugal to New York City, New York on May 2, 1941.
  • MssA_L668_F02_001_online.pdf

    A two-page letter from Jewish American Sol Levy (1865-1944) written on a transatlantic steamer from France to New York City. Levy shares news of the outbreak of World War II, describes the conditions on the ship, and notes the large number of Jewish passengers.

    Sol Levy was born in 1865 in Alsace-Lorraine, a region that alternately fell under the control of Germany and France in the 19th century and during World Wars I and II in the 20th century. After migrating to the United States in 1882, Levy moved to Louisville and worked as a wholesale merchant, establishing the Gould-Levy Company in 1907.
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