The Filson Historical Society Digital Projects

Browse Items (21 total)

  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/12/msscc_compagnie_de_colonisation-copy.jpg

    French stock certificate for one share in the Compagnie de Colonisation Americaine (American Colonization Company). Share is for 100 acres of land in Virginia and Kentucky for an investment of 1300 francs. Yields six percent annual interest. Dividends paid annually over thirty years using the attached coupons.
  • 1936_1_1_1 copy.jpg

    Quilt belonging to Elizabeth Tyler Sturgeon. The quilt has strips of hand-woven cloth believed to have been made locally in Jefferson County, Kentucky, alternating with a commercial indigo print that was imported into the United States. The quilt, the oldest quilt in the Filson's collection, is more than 100 inches long on each side and was completely hand-stitched. Eliza married Thomas Sturgeon in 1816, who died seven years into their marriage in 1822. Eliza then took on the responsibility of managing their farm in addition to rearing her three young sons. Eliza enslaved seven people who provided crucial labor for the success of the farm and household. After her husband died, an unidentified enslaved woman helped Eliza manage the farm. In 1833, Eliza died from cholera leaving her three sons, all under the age of eighteen, to live with her brother.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/12/1947_2_26.jpg

    Samplers were a staple in the education of girls, designed to teach needlework skills needed for household duties. Samples could be symbolic of the girl's culture, religion, social class, or personal accomplishments. Sampler making was seen as the ground work for civic, social, and familial responsibility. This was made by Abigail Prather Churchill the daughter of Abigail Pope Oldham Churchill (1789-1854), around age 11-13 at Nazareth Academy (which is near Bardstown, KY).
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/12/1913_1_27-copy.jpg

    An 'M's & O's' patterned sheet made of linen and cotton. The family narratives for this linen sheet states that it was made in 1816 by Betsy Breckinridge Meredith, sister of John Breckinridge. Family narrative also states the flax was grown, spun, and woven by enslaved people on the Winton Plantation. Enslaved women and men were skilled spinners, weavers, and seamstress on the frontier. Their skilled labor made life easier and more comfortable for their enslavers.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/12/1936_1_11.jpg

    Sheet belonging to Elizabeth Tyler Sturgeon. Elizabeth married Thomas Sturgeon in 1816, who died only seven years into their marriage. Elizabeth then took on the responsibility of managing their farm while also raising her three young sons. Elizabeth enslaved seven people who provided crucial labor that contributed to the success of the farm and household. After her husband died, an unidentified enslaved woman helped Elizabeth manage the farm. In 1833, Eliza died from cholera, leaving her three sons, all under the age of eighteen, to live with her brother.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/12/1936_1_10.jpg

    Sheet belonging to Elizabeth Tyler Sturgeon. Elizabeth married Thomas Sturgeon in 1816, who died only seven years into their marriage. Elizabeth then took on the responsibility of managing their farm while also raising her three young sons. Elizabeth enslaved seven people who provided crucial labor that contributed to the success of the farm and household. After her husband died, an unidentified enslaved woman helped Elizabeth manage the farm. In 1833, Eliza died from cholera, leaving her three sons, all under the age of eighteen, to live with her brother.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/12/1936_1_9.jpg

    Linen coverlet belonging to Elizabeth Tyler Sturgeon. Elizabeth married Thomas Sturgeon in 1816, who died only seven years into their marriage. Elizabeth then took on the responsibility of managing their farm while also raising her three young sons. Elizabeth enslaved seven people who provided crucial labor that contributed to the success of the farm and household. After her husband died, an unidentified enslaved woman helped Elizabeth manage the farm. In 1833, Eliza died from cholera, leaving her three sons, all under the age of eighteen, to live with her brother.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/12/1936_1_7.jpg

    Handwoven, linen bedcover belonging to Elizabeth Tyler Sturgeon. Elizabeth married Thomas Sturgeon in 1816, who died only seven years into their marriage. Elizabeth then took on the responsibility of managing their farm while also raising her three young sons. Elizabeth enslaved seven people who provided crucial labor that contributed to the success of the farm and household. After her husband died, an unidentified enslaved woman helped Elizabeth manage the farm. In 1833, Eliza died from cholera, leaving her three sons, all under the age of eighteen, to live with her brother.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/12/1936_1_8.jpg

    Cotton bedspread belonging to Elizabeth Tyler Sturgeon. Elizabeth married Thomas Sturgeon in 1816, who died only seven years into their marriage. Elizabeth then took on the responsibility of managing their farm while also raising her three young sons. Elizabeth enslaved seven people who provided crucial labor that contributed to the success of the farm and household. After her husband died, an unidentified enslaved woman helped Elizabeth manage the farm. In 1833, Eliza died from cholera, leaving her three sons, all under the age of eighteen, to live with her brother.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/12/1936_1_4.jpg

    Handwoven, linen tablecloth belonging to Elizabeth Tyler Sturgeon. Elizabeth married Thomas Sturgeon in 1816, who died only seven years into their marriage. Elizabeth then took on the responsibility of managing their farm while also raising her three young sons. Elizabeth enslaved seven people who provided crucial labor that contributed to the success of the farm and household. After her husband died, an unidentified enslaved woman helped Elizabeth manage the farm. In 1833, Eliza died from cholera, leaving her three sons, all under the age of eighteen, to live with her brother. We can’t say with certainty that Eliza made this textile because weaving was generally done by professional male weavers or enslaved men and women. Either Eliza and/or an enslaved laborer may have spun fibers that were cultivated on her farm, and then turned over to a weaver to make into cloth. The woven panels would have then been seamed and hemmed at home. There is evidence there may have been a loom house on one of the neighboring Tyler family farms.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/12/1936_1_2.jpg

    Cotton pillowcase belonging to Elizabeth Tyler Sturgeon (1791-1833). Elizabeth married Thomas Sturgeon in 1816, who died only seven years into their marriage. Elizabeth then took on the responsibility of managing their farm in Jefferson County, Kentucky, while also raising her three young sons. Elizabeth enslaved seven people who provided crucial labor that contributed to the success of the farm and household. After her husband died, an unidentified enslaved woman helped Elizabeth manage the farm. In 1833, Eliza died from cholera, leaving her three sons, all under the age of eighteen, to live with her brother.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/12/1998_8_2.jpg

    Elizabeth Logan Hardin (1786-1853) was born on the Kentucky frontier at Logan's Station (also known as St. Asaph's; present Stanford). She was one of nine children of Ann Montgomery and Benjamin Logan, one of Kentucky's early military and political leaders. who fought in the Indian wars of the 1770s and 1780s in the struggle to wrest control of Kentucky from the Native Americans. Elizabeth married Martin D. Hardin on 20 January 1809. At age thirty-nine, Elizabeth became a pregnant widow with three children between the ages of five and thirteen, and a failing farm (near Frankfort) that was $50,000 in debt. Elizabeth ran the farm as a single woman for seven years before she married Porter Clay in 1816. They sold the farm and moved to Illinois, but their strained marriage ended in separation. She returned to Kentucky and died in Shelby County where she is buried.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/11/rb_615-32_r138_1828_cover.jpg

    Manual of the medical botany of the United States, containing excerpts about American Maidenhair, common hemlock, common dogwood, yellow ladies' slipper, common strawberry, american pennyroyal, common dandelion, and sweet water-lily.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/11/rb_917-3_m794_1821_cover.jpg
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/11/rb_917-3_c489t_1828_cover.jpg

    Translated from the French by an English gentleman, who resided in America at the period, with notes by the translator. Also, a biographical sketch of the author, letters from Gen. Washington to the Marquis de Chastellux, and notes and corrections by the American editor.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/11/rb_917-7_h177_1828_cover.jpg

    Containing sketches of scenery, manners, and customs, and anecdotes connected with the first settlements of the western sections of the United States.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/11/rb_917-6_k69_1824_cover.jpg

    Title page of Letters from the South and West. Contains observations on the first settlers of Kentucky as well as their cabins, crops, animals and customs.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/11/rb_285-1_b622_1824_cover.jpg

    Title page. Contains memoirs of Rev. David Rice, and sketches of the origin and present state of particular churches, and of the lives and labors of a number of men who were eminent and useful in their day. Of special interests by David Rice are, "An Apistle to the citizens of Kentucky, professing Christianity" (1805), "a second epistle to the citizens of Kentucky, professing the Christian religion" (1808), and "Slavery inconsistent with justice and good policy" (1792). First published in 1824.
  • RXSM_627-13_F624_1824.jpg

    Map of the Falls of the Ohio, from actual survey, adapted to the low water of 1819. Shows both Baker's route for a canal on the Kentucky side of the river and Flint's route for a canal on the Indiana side.
  • https://filsonhistoricalimages.files.wordpress.com/2022/11/sm_976-8_j63_1825-copy.jpg

    Map of Kentucky and Tennessee, 1825
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