Camp Zachary Taylor Collection

Title

Camp Zachary Taylor Collection

Description

In 1917, nearly three thousand acres of farmland and open fields outside of the city of Louisville, Kentucky were transformed into an active military camp with around two thousand buildings. Four short years later the land, buildings, and equipment were auctioned off, and the Camp Taylor neighborhood was born. Images and documents from the Filson’s collection illustrate the changing ownership and landscape of the Camp Zachary Taylor area and illuminate the history of Louisville’s World War I cantonment. 

Source

The Filson Historical Society Special Collections and Photograph Collection

Rights

The Filson Historical Society believes that the item is in the Public Domain under the laws of the United States but a determination was not made as to its copyright status under the copyright laws of other countries. The Item may not be in the Public Domain under the laws of other countries. Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information. https://rightsstatements.org/page/NoC-US/1.0/?language=en
For reproduction inquiries- please visit https://filsonhistorical.org/special-collections/rights-and-reproductions/

Format

Photographs and manuscript materials

Type

Still images and text

Collection Items

940 French Avenue, 1917
W. S. Bodley sold this home and property for the Camp; in 1921, some of the property was repurchased by Rogers Clark Ballard Thruston and given to the city of Louisville as George Rogers Clark Park. This house remained in the residential area.

3760 Illinois Avenue, 1917
Supposedly the home of early Jefferson County settler Elizabeth Prather, the Ben Boerste house is across Illinois Avenue from the Louisville Nature Center’s parking lot.

1215 Hess Lane, n.d.
Behind Battery E of the 6th Regiment Field Artillery Replacement stands the former home of Herman Kurz, a Louisville grocer. You can see the house on Hess Lane today.

3823 Glenside Place and 1700 Marwood Drive, 1917
Brothers William and Joseph Crawford owned adjoining farms off Poplar Level Road before World War I, and both had to make way for the camp. Today their farmhouses sit streets apart in a residential area between Poplar Level and Illinois Avenue.

3001 Greenup Road, 1917
Dr. James C. Mitchell leased and then sold his home and property for the Camp, but its distinctive frame remains in the neighborhood behind George Rogers Clark Park.

4211 Poplar Level Road, 1917
Purchased by the US Government from Katherine Dahl, this home housed Camp Commander Major General Harry Hale. Today it is for sale.

940 French Avenue, 2017
W. S. Bodley sold this home and property for the Camp; in 1921, some of the property was repurchased by Rogers Clark Ballard Thruston and given to the city of Louisville as George Rogers Clark Park. This house remained in the residential area.

3760 Illinois Avenue, 2017
Supposedly the home of early Jefferson County settler Elizabeth Prather, the Ben Boerste house is across Illinois Avenue from the Louisville Nature Center’s parking lot.

1215 Hess Lane, 2017
Behind Battery E of the 6th Regiment Field Artillery Replacement stands the former home of Herman Kurz, a Louisville grocer. You can see the house on Hess Lane today.

3823 Glenside Place and 1700 Marwood Drive, 2017
Brothers William and Joseph Crawford owned adjoining farms off Poplar Level Road before World War I, and both had to make way for the camp. Today their farmhouses sit streets apart in a residential area between Poplar Level and Illinois Avenue.
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